Saturday, December 4, 2010

My Trade With Bo, Part III of 2847592947582

Bo Trade At A Glance:



There have been a lot of cards with pictures of Dennis "Oil Can" Boyd looking like he angrily wants to throw a ball through the batter, his own catcher, the umpire, the backstop and the first 10 rows, but I think this 1990 Score card may be the best. The back of the card refers to him as an "emotional righthander". Yep.

As you may have figured out, it's time for some action shots!


 Our hero Gorman Thomas, sent to the strange new world of Cleve-land, looking like he's learning how to hit again. This one has a vulnerability to it, almost like he doesn't know if he can play ball without a Brewers uniform on.


I began following and collecting Bob Walk not for his contributions on the field (though his numbers are better than most give him credit for, especially considering how he got jerked around early in his career), but because I've heard him broadcast some Pirates games in the past few years and I think he's hilarious. He's got the perfect demeanor for calling the games of a team that's lost in the woods like the Pirates are. It's like he's aware that there's a ballgame on and he's paying attention, but he knows how it's probably gonna end, so the hell with it. That's what I've gotten from listening to him, anyway. I'd imagine that many Pirates fans are in the same boat as he is, so he gives great voice to a fanbase that's probably exasperated to the point of apathy. Back to the card at hand: I got a bunch of Bob's cards in this deal, and they're all pretty good, but I think that this '89 Upper Deck one is the best. He's clearly and obviously muttering something dirty under his breath. Think Tom Hanks as Jimmy Dugan in "A League Of Their Own" here and you get the picture.


I found this Dan Quisenberry card to be really unusual and somber, especially for one of his cards. Usually, Quis has a smile on, that pastel blue Royals uniform on (What was up with the Cards picking up other teams' lifers in the late 80's?), and you can't miss that great mustache. This picture looks like an inset photo on the back cover of a Scott Walker album. It's all shadows and deep thoughts. If you showed this shot, by itself, to a lot of longtime Royals fans, I don't know if they'd be guess that it's Dan Quisenberry.


Ben Oglivie, in the middle of what looks like the happiest home run trot ever. He looks like he was saying "Yeah, I was happy, so what?" in the headshot.


More Brewer love. How can you not love a Moose Haas rookie card? I think it should be required to love any ballplayer who goes by "Moose", regardless of affiliation. Nothing but blue behind him. "The sky was the limit", as Tom Petty once sang.


Of all the people to forget to include in my first version of this post, how could it possibly be Teddy Ballgame? I've actually got almost no cards of Ted Williams; no playing era cards, no manager cards (yet; some of his best cards were from his managing days), and hardly any later issues, so this card, even being the same design that Upper Deck beat to death with Baseball Heroes, was one of the unexpected highlights of the deal.


I mean, if it were just poor Anthony Young that I forgot, I guess that'd be understandable. Nah, I'm just kidding. This poor guy. Disrespected by legions of fans, late night talk show hosts and the record books (wins and losses are, as most statheads will tell you, often far out of the hands of the guy on the mound), even though he was a pretty good pitcher. At least he can say he was a "Rated Rookie", thanks to Donruss. There is the small matter of him getting to do what millions of others, myself included, dream of doing. I have to say that, if you promised me that I could pitch in the bigs, but told me in advance that I'd have to lose 27 in a row while playing for a New York club, I'd still sign up and still try my damnedest to win every game even if I did know the results before I started, but he didn't get the benefit of that advance warning. You don't usually make it to the major leagues without competitive fire in you, so every one of those losses must've stung. He must have loved, and must still love the game, because Wikipedia has him coaching Little League in Houston (a great youth baseball town, but still). Most people would hide under their couch and run screaming if someone yelled "Play ball!" within 100 miles of them after what he had to endure as a player, and he's out there teaching kids how to play. I'd imagine that those kids get some good life lessons from this guy on how to stay loose and enjoy yourself even when bad things happen. Good for him.


I'm wrapping this one up with a double shot of Mookie. The combination of the mirrored shades and what looks like him strutting to wherever he's going? Wow. Stunningly badass. Conventional wisdom would suggest he's either leading off of 1st or heading back there, but he's basically on the grass. Who does that? Mookie does.


And finally, one from the "Cards that should be in 3D" department. Or the "Cards that should be Photoshopped so that Mookie Wilson looks like he's flying in outer space" department. Or both! Photoshoppers, get to work!

1 comment:

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.